Holland vow to fly the rainbow flag in support of OneLove campaign in light of UEFA ‘ban’ confusion – Asia Despatch

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Holland vow to fly the rainbow flag in support of pro-LGBTQI+ OneLove campaign in light of ‘ban’ confusion… as UEFA are forced to DENY they are stopping Oranje fans from displaying symbol in Budapest

  • UEFA were forced to deny reports they are stopping fans wearing rainbow flags
  • Reports claimed Holland fans were stopped from displaying symbol in Budapest
  • Oranje fans protesting ‘anti-gay’ legislation passed by Hungarian Government
  • The KNVB vowed to fly rainbow flag in supports of LGBTQI+ OneLove campaign 
  • Georginio Wijnaldum will wear a rainbow-coloured captain’s armband in game
  • UEFA’s decision to deny rainbow lights display on Allianz Arena sparked outrage
  • Find out the latest Euro 2020 news including fixtures, live action and results here











Holland have vowed to fly the rainbow flag in support of the OneLove campaign after UEFA were forced to deny they were stopping supporters from displaying the pro-LGBTQ+ symbol in Budapest. 

New ‘anti-gay’ laws in Hungary has provoked a fierce backlash in recent weeks, with many countries choosing to protest the decision at Euro 2020 games.

A legislation was passed by Viktor Orban’s populist right-wing government banning gay people from appearing in educational materials in schools or messages that promote gender change for under 18s approved.

In protest, Oranje fans planned to show their support for the OneLove campaign ahead of the countries last-16 tie against Czech Republic in Budapest, with captain Georginio Wijnaldum set to wear a rainbow-coloured armband.

Several Dutch publications including rtlneiws had reported that security guards are stopping fans from wearing the flags, reportedly under instruction from UEFA.

But the European football governing body quickly denied the claims, saying they would allow rainbow flags inside the Puskas Arena and Budapest fan zones.

Holland fans have showed their support for LGTBQI+ community

Reports claimed fans were being prevented from displaying rainbow flag in Budapest

UEFA denied claims they had banned Holland supporters from flying rainbow flag in Budapest after Dutch reports claimed they stopped pro-LGBTQI+ symbol from entering stadium

UEFA acted quickly to deny reports, insisting they welcome any such symbol into the grounds

UEFA acted quickly to deny reports, insisting they welcome any such symbol into the grounds

European football governing body said they deemed rainbow-coloured symbols not political

European football governing body said they deemed rainbow-coloured symbols not political

A statement from UEFA read: ‘Contrary to some reports in Dutch media, UEFA would like to clarify that it has not banned any rainbow-coloured symbols from the fan zone in Budapest, which is under the responsibility of the local authorities. 

‘UEFA would very much welcome any such symbol into the fan zone.

‘UEFA today informed the Hungarian Football Federation that rainbow-coloured symbols are not political and in line with UEFA’s #EqualGame campaign, which fights against all discrimination, including against the LGBTQI+ community, such flags will be allowed into the stadium.

Dutch governing body KNVB vowed to unwaver in their support for the One Love campaign

Dutch governing body KNVB vowed to unwaver in their support for the One Love campaign

Captain Georginio Wijnaldum will wear rainbow-coloured armband to protest discrimination

Captain Georginio Wijnaldum will wear rainbow-coloured armband to protest discrimination

Hungary’s new ‘anti-LGBT’ law

Hungary’s new law is ostensibly designed to crack down on paedophilia, but critics argue amendments to it make a dangerous link between homosexuality and the abuse of minors. 

The law prohibits sharing any content portraying homosexuality or sex reassignment to children under 18 in school sex education programs, films and advertisements.

Human rights groups have denounced the measure, saying it could be used to stigmatize and harass residents because of their sexual orientation or gender identities, and deprive young people of essential sex education information.

Thousands have protested in Hungary’s capital of Budapest against the measures.

A number of EU countries including Germany have condemned the law, and a joint statement was released on Tuesday voicing ‘grave concern’ about its impact on the LGBT community. 

Last December homosexual couples were also effectively banned from adopting children, as part of Viktor Orban’s reforms.

Dutch football’s governing body pledged their full support for the OneLove campaign following the seemingly false reports that flags were being confiscated in the city. 

A KNVB statement read: ‘The rules of UEFA apply in the fan zone and in the stadium. 

‘But the KNVB does not support this decision. We are pro-rainbow flag and support the OneLove campaign. 

‘All KNVB directors will wear a pin from the OneLove campaign today.’ 

The confusion follows the European governing body’s decision to ban Germany from displaying a rainbow light display on the Allianz Arena for the visit of Hungary on Wednesday as they deemed gesture too political.

Their subsequent explanation riled up fans even more, with European Commission Vice President Margaritis Schinas  saying there was no ‘reasonable excuse’ for their stance.

Following the decision, UEFA released a statement saying: ‘Some people have interpreted UEFA’s decision to turn down the city of Munich’s request to illuminate the Munich stadium in rainbow colours for a Euro 2020 match as ”political”.

‘On the contrary, the request itself was political, linked to the Hungarian football team’s presence in the stadium for this evening’s match with Germany.

‘For UEFA, the rainbow is not a political symbol, but a sign of our firm commitment to a more diverse and inclusive society.’

UEFA are also looking into reports of offensive banners, alleged monkey chants and homophobic comments aimed by fans at players during Hungary’s Group F games against Portugal and France.

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